This is My Kind of Wonderful.

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The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

Terry Pratchett, “Men At Arms”

This is one of the best breakdowns I’ve ever seen of how expensive it is to be poor. (via sosungalittleclodofclay)

(Source: slephoto, via quackdown)

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snailempire:

"Destiny Buck, of the Wanapum tribe, rides her mare, Daisy, in the yearly Indian princess competition in Pendleton, Oregon. Embraced first for war, hunting, and transport, horses became partners in pageantry and a way to show tribal pride."
Photographed by Erika Larsen

snailempire:

"Destiny Buck, of the Wanapum tribe, rides her mare, Daisy, in the yearly Indian princess competition in Pendleton, Oregon. Embraced first for war, hunting, and transport, horses became partners in pageantry and a way to show tribal pride."

Photographed by Erika Larsen

(via procrastinationiskey)